Archives for posts with tag: interviewing

The service industry in the U.S. represents 80% of U.S. private-sector employment, or 89.7 million jobs. For many people with no defined specialty qualifications, service work is often a core part of their income while they train for highly skilled positions or earn money while they explore their career options.

Hidden with this job sector is the evolving deployment of facial-recognition / biometric systems designed to reduce the number of employees required to do service jobs and sell services/products from a centralized source direct to consumers.

Biometric technology is also becoming linked to voice systems that rely on biometric authentication to complete transactions that otherwise would be handled by a salesperson on the phone or in-person.

Consider this:5bb514fe9a4ab837125e8dbc-640-170.jpg

Take a look at this scenario in terms of time and what may eventually become AI making a purchase decision for you by selecting “the best option” based on your known preferences without the need for cash and with no direct interaction with a person.Picture1.png

As society moves toward being cashless and biometrically authenticated, in some cities homeless people are wearing barcodes around their necks in an attempt to increase donations. The organization Greater Change, gives homeless people a QR code, similar to the kind issued for online tickets. People who want to give money – but who may not have any change in their pocket – can scan the code using their smart phone and make an online payment to that person. The donation goes into an account which is managed by a case worker who ensures that the money is spent on agreed targets, such as saving for a rental deposit or for groceries.

shutterstock_1040224093-1240x827Stop for a moment and think about how this technology will change the job market as we know it. Essentially, the majority of “support employees” could be replaced by an ecommerce tied to minimal staff with the purchasing process all done from your phone. Watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ec77S25kuVs

Think AI and biometrics are years away – take a closer look.

Facebook’s DeepFace program can now determine whether 2 photographed faces belong to the same person, with an accuracy rate of 97.25%. When taking the same test, humans answer correctly in 97.53% of cases, or just 0.28% better than the Facebook program.

Google’s FaceNet links a face to its owner with almost perfect results.

Look to China for where the world of work is heading as it related to technology and how the business world is changing from people-based to digital-enabled.

20170619023622335In Guangzhou, BingoBox has built a network of 300 fully automated convenience stores. The free-standing glass boxes, about half the size of a 7-Eleven, stock a similar assortment of merchandise, all of it labeled with RFID tags. Shoppers scan a QR code displayed on the front of the store with the WeChat app. Selected items are placed on a counter, and an RFID reader instantly and tallies the total. Shoppers pay via a mobile phone. A scanner near the door verifies that a customer is leaving with only the goods they paid for.

 A Car Vending MachineN52WO3XCDFHURHWXD5RU2S36NE

Instead of having to go from dealership to dealership see the new models, a prospective buyer can schedule a test drive at their convenience by going online to pick up the vehicle at a Ferris-wheel-like vending machine built by Alibaba. The structure holds 30 automobiles in a stack—including models by BMW, Ford and Volvo. The fee for a three-day test drive is only a couple of hundred yuan (less than $50), but the security deposit can go up to the thousands.

ab9507c9-c0b8-45e9-b454-f71b6e6c414dThe Return of the Automat

In the Zhejiang province famed for its sticky-rice dumplings, has equipped its outlets with an Alibaba-powered technology that allows a diner to order food on their mobile phone or a screen at the entrance of the restaurant and then pick up his meal from lockers connected to the kitchen. When his food is ready, the customer receives a notification on his phone with a locker number. The cubby clicks open as they approach. Drinks are dispensed from smart vending machines that look like refrigerators that are unlocked by scanning a QR code on the door with a phone. After the customer closes the door again, the app automatically charges them for the bottles he takes by reading radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags attached to the drinks.

Types of Biometric Devices

download.jpgRetina Scanner – These scan the unique biometric pattern in each person’s iris, and match it against a certain number of unique identifying marks that set every person apart from everyone else. Iris scanning and retinal scanning are both used to identify a person according to their unique pattern, but they tend to be far costlier and more complex.

Finger Print Scanner – As far as price goes, the fingerprint scanning is on the lower end of the scale. The cheapest fingerprint scanners are the ones that only scan the actual print, though the costlier ones actually scan the presence of blood in the fingerprint, the size and shape of the thumb, and many other features. These costlier systems actually capture a 3D image of the fingerprint, thereby making it much more difficult for the fingerprint to be counterfeited.

FBI_Face_Recognition1-225x150.pngEach person around the world has a distinctly unique face, even two twins that the human eye cannot tell apart. It may be something as small as the slightly different placing of the eyebrows, the width of the eyes, or the breadth of the nose. There are certain markers that enable these biometric recognition scanners to instantly identify the uniqueness of each person scanning their facial features, thus enabling the device to ensure that only the single person with the correct bone structure and feature placement can gain access.

images.jpgEvery person in the world has a unique voice pattern, even though the changes are slight and barely noticeable to the human ear. However, with special voice recognition software, those tiny differences in each person’s voice can be noted, tested, and authenticated to only allow access to the person that has the right tone, pitch, and volume of voice. It’s surprisingly effective at differentiating two people who have almost identical voice patterns.

As the adoption of biometric technology increases, it may decrease service related jobs but also create higher skilled work mainly in the area of software engineering, production, testing, implementation and maintenance of biometric systems.

Today’s workers are faced with a unique challenge: maintaining strong employability in a job market that’s constantly changing and evolving with new industries and technologies.

https_blogs-images.forbes.comdavidsturtfiles201601bureau-of-labor_v2-06-1200x900

The U.S. Department of Labor reports that the average U.S. worker changes jobs every 4.6 years, making it more important than ever to be able to adapt to new career needs as industries change. If you’re a service industry worker now, anticipate the need to upgrade your technical skills to enhance your employability.

Regard of what you do for a living, ensure your financial security by being relevant for work that is in demand and have skills that you have “reality verified” as marketable and in demand in a career field that interests you.

Finding a job is no easy thing, and even though technological advancements have seemingly made the process easier and more user-friendly, in many cases it’s more complicated than ever before. Job boards on the internet might seem like an easy way to get your resume out there, but it’s just as easy to be overlooked.

As job seekers and recruiters continue their searches a new tool is quickly rising to the top as a way to find the best people for the right positions: Big Data. Knowing how big data is being used now for recruiting and job searching can give people an advantage over the competition.

Think of how many people apply online for a position when a business posts on a job board. Some companies receive thousands of resumes for a single opening, so it’s understandable that qualified candidates can fall through the cracks. With such a deluge of resumes, companies are applying big data analytics practices to a field of prospective job seekers.

resume-filtering-software-hiring-process-how-robots-find-humans-resume-filtering-software-job-search-guide-how-to-beat-resume-filtering-software.jpg

cdf3eda961d0b97ad7e3b004aec03345.jpg

Big data, however, goes much further than search queries and talent management systems.

Many businesses are actually developing profiles on people based upon their social media presence. This even applies to people who aren’t actively searching for a job.

Businesses build their own resumes of candidates by identifying details from people’s social media profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other sites. From these profiles, companies use big data tools to identify patterns of behavior, interests and skills that are qualifying factors for current and future job openings. If the targeted individual isn’t looking for a job at the moment, businesses will likely keep them on file for future reference.

real-impact-social-media.jpg

With social media playing such an integral role in big data recruitment, job seekers need to do what they can to manage their profiles with the intent of gaining a job in mind. That means using your social media presence to emphasize your work-related skills and demonstrating your abilities.

Curating your profiles also requires you to engage in discussions with other people in your field of choice, showcasing your thoughts and opinions and helping direct discussions. Using this process, you may even become known as a thought leader, someone to turn to when others want an expert’s opinion.

Dca3-CkX4AA-s6n.jpg

The bottom line: You need to put yourself in a position to take advantage of big data and utilize it to get noticed. The more understanding you have of how big data is affecting job searches, the faster you can get it working for you.

A study just released by Lever, a hiring management system used by small and mid-sized companies around the world describes how 600 of their clients hired 15,000 people – the real surprise in that 1.5 million people applied for these 15K jobs – only 1% of the total.

If you’re a job seeker this may seem like finding a job is a long-shot, however, taking a closer look at the numbers tells a different story.

  • The odds were worse for people who applied on a job board – 130 to one – yet 48% of their jobs were filled this way. Although it’s inefficient, it is a major source of hires.
  • Dollarphotoclub_68328671.jpgGetting referred was the best way to get a job. It only took 12 people to hire someone this way. This is 10X better than applying. According to the Lever data only 14% of all jobs were filled by referrals.
  • Only 4% of all hires came through a recruiting agency but in these cases the company only needed to see 25 people to hire one person.
  • This direct sourcing approach represented 34% of all hires and its recruiters needed to screen 65 people to yield one hire.

For more senior-level staff and mid-management positions. less than 20% are filled via people who apply online, 40% are referrals (including recruiting firms and staffing agencies) and 40% are direct sourced.

Consider these insights:

  1. Mix it up. Go narrow and deep rather than broad and shallow. Use a mix of all the techniques. Idea: Find 20 jobs every week you think look interesting and narrow this list down to the best five. And then only apply to 2-3 of them you’re perfectly qualified to handle. But don’t just wait to hear if the company is interested. Instead use the backdoor to get an interview. This means finding someone in the company who can get you a referral to the hiring manager.
  2. navigation-2-square.jpgGet found. Reverse engineer your LinkedIn profile and online resume to make sure recruiters can find it. When they find it make sure your major accomplishments and track record are instantly visible.
  3. Bypass screeners. If you get an onsite interview the chances for getting a job are (10%) regardless of how you were initially found, with one exception. For referrals it’s twice that at 20%.
  4. 20151111140508-social-media-icons-iphone-network-business-communication-web.jpgBuild a true network.Networking is getting people who can vouch for your abilities to recommend you open jobs they know about. In parallel, actively participate in business and groups where people in your field hang out. Recruiters review these online listings to get referrals.
  5. Build a reverse network. Take calls from recruiters. Listen to what they have to say and then provide a great referral. They will pay you back with future interviews.
  6. Force a discovery interview. If you do ALL of the above, you will probably get an interview. But the likelihood you’ll get an offer is still only 10% unless you’ve been referred, increasing your odds by 20%.

To increase your odds of getting an offer you need to make sure you’re being interviewed accurately. Ask the interviewer about some of the big tasks the person hired will likely be assigned to handle. Then give detailed examples of work you’ve accomplished that’s most comparable and you’ll likely be invited back as a finalist.

Ultimately you need to commit to doing what other candidates aren’t willing to do. That’s how you stand out. Consider these tips:

  1. Find the company you want to work for.

Many job seekers respond to as many job postings as possible, hoping the numbers will be on their side. But shotgun resume submissions result in hiring managers sifting through dozens of candidates to find the right person.

To show the hiring manager you are the right candidate, you have to do the work. Instead of shot-gunning your resume, put in the time to determine a company you definitely want to work for in terms of the job and cultural fit.

  1. Preparing-To-Sell-Your-Company.jpgReally know the company.

You can’t possibly know if you want to work for my company unless you know a lot about the company; that’s the difference between just wanting a job and wanting an actual role in a business. Check out management and employees on social media. When you know the people, you know the company. Learn as much as you can, then leverage that knowledge.

  1. Determine how you will make an immediate impact in the role.

Training takes time, money and effort. An ideal new hire can be productive immediately. While you don’t need to be able to do everything required in the job, it helps if the company can see an immediate return on their hiring investment. (Remember, hiring you is an investment that needs to generate a return.) Identify one or two important things you can contribute from day one.

  1. torn-paper-Show-me.jpgDon’t just tell. Show.

Put what you can offer on display. If you’re a programmer, mock up a new application. If you want a sales position, create a plan for how you’ll target a new market or customer base, or describe how you will implement marketing strategies the business doesn’t currently use.

  1. Use a referral as a reinforcement.

Business is all about relationships.  Knowing that someone we trust is willing to vouch for you is a data point that often tips the decision scale toward giving you an interview, and even giving you the job.

  1. i-am-the-one-who-knocks.jpgBe the one who knocks.

Don’t wait to be called for an interview. Don’t even wait for an opening to be posted; after all, you’ve identified ways you can immediately help the company you want to work for. Approach people right and they will pay attention.

1_VpUPrHnUuA-I4leAmMHZjQ.jpg

The key to success that wins in the job market is knowing your audience. Define how you can help a company fix real problems in their market, after you understand their world and their perspectives, you can validate these findings with a mix of empirical or intuitive thinking – that’s what will get you hired.

%d bloggers like this: